Silver Leaf Investment: An upstart marijuana investment company to watch in 2017

Copyright © 2017 All Rights Reserved
by Erik Muenker D.C. |  Exclusive CBDbusinessBlog.com

Marijuana is Growing Fast

The legal cannabis (marijuana) industry is booming. According to Forbes.com, it was worth an estimated $7.2 billion in 2016. With double digit annual growth, adult recreational sales alone are expected to jump from $2.6 billion in 2016 to $11.2 billion by 2020.

In addition to recreational sale, medical marijuana sales are expected to more than double to $13.3 billion by 2020. That’s a combined annual market of over $24 billionanticipated in just the next 3 years.

Does AG Sessions worry you?

Jobs, state’s rights, and taxes. That’s right. Jobs, state’s rights and tax revenue are the cannabis industry’s secret weapons against marijuana detractors in the Trump administration and elsewhere.

According to a survey conducted by Marijuana Business Daily, the marijuana industry already employs over 100,000 people in the U.S. alone.

Along with billions in sales, comes millions in tax revenue. Motley Fool estimated that in 2016, Colorado’s marijuana tax haul likely exceeded $200 million. That’s a lot of green. And it’s only going to continue to grow each year.

Continue reading “Silver Leaf Investment: An upstart marijuana investment company to watch in 2017”

Spotlight: Marijuana company Canopy Growth now in S&P/TSX Index

Copyright © 2017 All Rights Reserved
by Erik Muenker D.C. |  Exclusive CBDbusinessBlog.com

 

Canopy_Growth_Corporation_logo.svg

SMITH FALLS, Ontario – Another milestone for the cannabis industry was reached today

Canopy Growth [TSX:WEED], Canada’s largest and arguably most successful marijuana company – has been added to the S&P/TSX Composite Index. The index represents nearly 70% of the total market capitalization on the Toronto Stock Exchange and is considered a key benchmark for the Canadian equity market.

With the addition of Canopy Growth to the index, more and more investors will now be buying and holding weed.

Canopy Growth has a market capitalization of $780.6 million and a year-to-date stock price change of +192%. Canopy Growth is definitely a cannabis company to watch in 2017.


Update – March 27th, 2017
Legal Marijuana in Canada by 2018
Legal Marijuana in Canada by 2018

According to the CBC, PM Tradeau will announce legislation on April 10th – to legalize marijuana for recreational use in Canada by July 1, 2018!

Shares of Canopy Growth Corp. jumped 11% in trading on the news.

Continue reading “Spotlight: Marijuana company Canopy Growth now in S&P/TSX Index”

Marijuana: The Big Weed Money on Vice News

Vice News: The Big Weed Money

VICE News gets an exclusive look inside Canopy Growth Corp., the Canadian marijuana producer that calls itself the world’s largest legal weed company.

After the Vice video about the Canopy Growth Corp was published, it was subsequently restricted to the UK audience alone.

Link to UK restricted video. Once the video is republished without this restriction I will update this post with the new version.

Until then, I have substituted the video with another from Vice News – intended for the U.S. audience:

So far the company has only been allowed to sell to medical patients, but that will all change when prime minister Justin Trudeau makes good on his promise to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes. And that’s especially good news for Canopy, which has been gearing up to dominate the future recreational market for years, even though the government hasn’t yet even unveiled its legalization plan. This year, its subsidiary Tweed announced a partnership with Snoop Dogg, and it became the first weed company to list on a major stock exchange.

But there’s questions around the corporation’s deep ties to the ruling Liberal party, and how much influence it has over government policy and who will get left out of Canada’s future weed regime.

Vancouver Cannabis Expo Shows Breadth & Growth of Marijuana Industry

CBD News Pick – The Canadian Press

A two day marijuana exhibition in Vancouver is giving people an idea of just how large and varied Canada’s cannabis industry has become — and where it could grow next.

More than 100 businesses set up booths to showcase their wares at the Vancouver Cannabis Expo, but not a single cloud of smoke could be seen in the massive hall.

The expo is helping to break down stereotypes and prove there’s a credible side to the industry, said Natasha Raey, spokeswoman for Lift Cannabis Co., which put on the show.

“It’s not just someone selling bud out of a ziploc bag anymore. You’re seeing real brand development. The industry is growing up,” she said.

A variety of wares were available throughout the hall. Among the booths selling seeds and growing equipment were some potentially unexpected exhibitors, including a firm that provides financing for marijuana-related businesses.

“As we’ve moved closer to legalization, we’ve seen a more corporate side of the industry come about. You’re seeing more businesses get interested and say ‘How can I be part of this industry that’s going to be huge?”‘ Raey said.

There has been extreme growth in the marijuana business over the past few years, said Matt Christopherson, who works for Keirton, a company in Surrey, B.C., that makes automatic marijuana trimmers used in large-scale marijuana production facilities.

“It’s no longer mom and pop. There’s a lot of money coming into this industry that legitimizes everything,” he said.

As the industry grows, the stigma traditionally associated with marijuana begins to fall away, Christopherson added.

“There’s a lot of people who are capitalists and they see this as an emerging market, one of the fastest growing sectors in the world.”

Working within the industry has become easier in recent years because more data has become available, said Scott Wilkins, an independent insurance agent who has spent the last eight years providing policies for people who grow marijuana.

Wilkins said his work began when a man with a Health Canada license approached him looking to get insurance so he could rent a commercial building, which was incredibly difficult at the time.

Now Wilkins said he has more than 800 clients, including big companies licensed by the federal government. And he expects his business to continue growing as the federal government moves toward legalizing marijuana for recreational use.

Click here to continue reading the published article.


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US: Banning Canadian Pot Users?!

CBD News Pick – Green Rush Daily

Goodale’s comments were in reaction to a Canadian resident, Matthew Harvey, of British Columbia, being stopped by border security while attempting to cross into Washington state. Harvey — who is legally permitted to use medical cannabis — admitted to having used cannabis recreationally during questioning. He was denied entry into the U.S. and was banned from ever entering in the future.

A Canadian official on Thursday called on the United States to abandon its border policy regarding the use of cannabis by those looking to travel to Canada’s neighbor to the south.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, in an interview on the Canadian Broadcasting Corp’s show “Power & Politics,” blasted the current policy banning self-professed cannabis users from entering the United States as “ludicrous.”

“We obviously need to intensify our discussions with our border authorities in the United States, including the Department of Homeland Security,” Goodale said, noting that four U.S. states — including Washington and Alaska, which border Canada — have passed laws allowing for the recreational use of cannabis. “This does seem to be a ludicrous situation.”

Goodale’s comments were in reaction to a Canadian resident, Matthew Harvey, of British Columbia, being stopped by border security while attempting to cross into Washington state. Harvey — who is legally permitted to use medical cannabis — admitted to having used cannabis recreationally during questioning. He was denied entry into the U.S. and was banned from ever entering in the future.

“They said that I was inadmissible because I admitted to smoking marijuana after the age of 18 and before I’d received my medical marijuana license,” Harvey said.

The news comes amid something of a renaissance in Canada on the issue of cannabis. The country announced in April at the UN General Assembly Special Session that it would seek to legalize recreational cannabis by the spring of 2017. Last month, the country released a number of new regulations regarding

“Our approach to drugs must be comprehensive, collaborative, and compassionate,” said Jane Philpott, Canada’s minister of health. “It must respect human rights while promoting shared responsibility. And it must have a firm scientific foundation. In Canada, we will apply those principles with regard to marijuana.”

Click here to continue reading the published article.


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Two of Canada’s BIG FIVE BANKS backing AWAY from Marijuana Industry

CBD News Pick – The Canadian Press

Two of Canada’s biggest banks – Scotiabank and the Royal Bank of Canada – say they aren’t providing accounts to companies in the marijuana industry, leaving some business owners scrambling to find alternate arrangements.

TORONTO – Scotiabank and the Royal Bank of Canada say they aren’t providing accounts to companies associated with the marijuana industry, leaving some business owners scrambling to find alternate arrangements.

After a decade-long relationship with Scotiabank (TSX:BNS), Hemp Country owner Nathan MacLellan says he received a letter from the bank late last month stating his account was being cancelled.

The store in Woodstock, Ont., sells marijuana-related items such as pipes and bongs but no actual cannabis, MacLellan says.

“It’s kind of insulting really, especially when legalization is right on the horizon,” he says.

“Nothing in the store that we sell is illegal. Every single variety store sells pipes and bongs nowadays, so why are they singling us out all of a sudden?”

Since then, MacLellan has managed to secure an account with a local credit union, but he says the process was not without headaches. The first credit union he contacted gave him the “same rigmarole” as Scotiabank, he says.

Earlier in August, a fledgling medical marijuana producer said it received a phone call from Scotiabank, advising them that it will no longer be doing business with cannabis-related companies.

The company, which is currently in the process of obtaining a licence to grow medical marijuana, did not want to be named due to its concerns that going public could negatively affect its application with Health Canada.

Scotiabank spokesman Rick Roth said in an email that due to privacy issues, the bank can’t comment on specific instances.

In general, however, Scotiabank aims to “manage risks soundly while making prudent business decisions,” said Roth.

“We consider our stringent risk management practices a key strength of our business,” he said.

“This is why the bank has taken the decision to close existing small business accounts and to prohibit the opening of new accounts for customers classified as ‘marijuana-related business.'”

Roth added that Scotiabank will continue to monitor the industry and may change its position in the future.

Royal Bank (TSX:RY) also confirmed that it doesn’t provide banking services to companies “engaged in the production and distribution of marijuana.”

“We confirm that as part of our normal business practices, the bank periodically reviews the client relationships we have against several factors used to balance the benefits and risks associated with providing them with banking services,” spokesman AJ Goodman said in an email.

“Please know that decisions like these are not taken lightly and are only done after a careful assessment.”

Bruce Linton, the CEO of Canopy Growth Corp., says he received a letter from RBC roughly a year ago informing him the bank was cancelling the licensed producer’s account.

He recalls that a few other licensed producers received similar letters around that time.

“My gut feeling is that probably someone in risk analysis somewhere determined that marijuana was a topic which had uncertainty surrounding it,” Linton said.
Click here to continue reading the published article.


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