Silver Leaf Investment: An upstart marijuana investment company to watch in 2017

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by Erik Muenker D.C. |  Exclusive CBDbusinessBlog.com

Marijuana is Growing Fast

The legal cannabis (marijuana) industry is booming. According to Forbes.com, it was worth an estimated $7.2 billion in 2016. With double digit annual growth, adult recreational sales alone are expected to jump from $2.6 billion in 2016 to $11.2 billion by 2020.

In addition to recreational sale, medical marijuana sales are expected to more than double to $13.3 billion by 2020. That’s a combined annual market of over $24 billionanticipated in just the next 3 years.

Does AG Sessions worry you?

Jobs, state’s rights, and taxes. That’s right. Jobs, state’s rights and tax revenue are the cannabis industry’s secret weapons against marijuana detractors in the Trump administration and elsewhere.

According to a survey conducted by Marijuana Business Daily, the marijuana industry already employs over 100,000 people in the U.S. alone.

Along with billions in sales, comes millions in tax revenue. Motley Fool estimated that in 2016, Colorado’s marijuana tax haul likely exceeded $200 million. That’s a lot of green. And it’s only going to continue to grow each year.

Continue reading “Silver Leaf Investment: An upstart marijuana investment company to watch in 2017”

Anchorage Reporter Faces 24 Years in Jail – for Marijuana??

CBD News Pick – The Guardian

Reporter who quit on air to fight for pot legalization could face decades in prison

Charlo Greene did not plan to curse on live television, but on 22 September 2014, the words came pouring out.

Then a reporter for KTVA, a station in Alaska, Greene ended her segment on marijuana by revealing that she was a proponent of legalization – and was the owner of the Alaska Cannabis Club, the subject of her news report.

charlo-greene_i-quit

“Fuck it, I quit,” she said, before abruptly walking off camera. The 26-year-old’s stunt shocked her colleagues and made her a viral sensation overnight.

Greene quickly became a full-time cannabis advocate, working to help Alaskans access pot after the state became the third in the US to legalize recreational pot in November 2014.

But despite the voter-approved initiative, Alaska has not helped her start a legitimate marijuana operation. On the contrary, the state launched a series of undercover operations and raids at her club, ultimately charging her with eight serious criminal offenses of “misconduct involving a controlled substance”.

If convicted, she could face 24+ years behind bars.

“It’s almost dizzying when you try to make sense of it,” Greene said in an exclusive interview with the Guardian about her upcoming trial. “It could literally cost me the rest of my adult life.”

TV news reporter quits live on air over Alaska Cannabis Club

The 28-year-old’s case – which she has called a “modern day lynching” – has raised a number of questions about the ongoing war on drugs and could have broader law enforcement implications as more US states move to legalize cannabis and regulate it like alcohol.

charlo-greene-facebook-800x430While reporters across the globe rushed to interview the activist after her comical on-air resignation, the Anchorage woman has struggled to get people to pay attention to her prosecution. Advocates say the charges against Greene, who is black, are particularly alarming given the government’s history of disproportionately targeting people of color for minor marijuana offenses with tough-on-crime policies that fueled mass incarceration.

Greene, whose legal name is Charlene Egbe, said she first became interested in marijuana in college when she discovered that it was a much healthier alternative to alcohol. After working at news stations in Georgia, Tennessee and West Virginia, Greene returned to her hometown in Alaska to work for the CBS affiliate where she was assigned to cover crime and courts – and eventually marijuana.

After meeting activists in Colorado and Washington, the first states to legalize recreational marijuana, Greene became passionate about its medicinal value.

“It was something I had been taking for granted – that this could literally be changing these people’s lives.”

Alaska has a complicated history of confusing and contradictory marijuana rules. The state was the first to legalize cannabis for in-home use in the 1970s and passed a formal medical law in 1998. Officials, however, never created a system for licensing medical dispensaries, meaning users had few legal options.

“No one could ever agree on what the state of the law in Alaska actually was,” said Robert MacCoun, a Stanford law professor.

But once weed became legal, Greene grew determined. She was particularly moved after meeting an older woman with a neurological disorder who was forced to buy marijuana on the streets – at one point leading her to be robbed at gunpoint.

The reporter organized a private patients’ association, which soon became more than just a hobby. Eventually, she decided to use her media job to unveil her cannabis club.

“I just spoke from my heart for the first time,” Greene recalled, noting that the infamous “fuck it” line was unplanned.

The 2014 measure – which legalized the manufacture, sale and possession of marijuana – went into effect in February 2015. The state, however, had not yet finalized its regulations for retail operations and in the interim, the Alaska Cannabis Club allowed people to purchase “memberships” – supplying marijuana when members made “donations”.

Detectives immediately targeted the operation, with six undercover purchases and two raids in a five-month period, records show.

“The fact that they were watching us for so long, I kind of felt violated,” said Jennifer Egbe, Greene’s 26-year-old sister, who helped out at the club. “I was really just heartbroken. I never assumed it would go this far.”

The raids, which brought armed officers to their property, were especially stressful for Greene, who was worried police might shoot one of her four siblings at the club.

“I saw all my siblings … with these guns that my tax dollars paid for pointed at them for what was now legal.”

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Vancouver Cannabis Expo Shows Breadth & Growth of Marijuana Industry

CBD News Pick – The Canadian Press

A two day marijuana exhibition in Vancouver is giving people an idea of just how large and varied Canada’s cannabis industry has become — and where it could grow next.

More than 100 businesses set up booths to showcase their wares at the Vancouver Cannabis Expo, but not a single cloud of smoke could be seen in the massive hall.

The expo is helping to break down stereotypes and prove there’s a credible side to the industry, said Natasha Raey, spokeswoman for Lift Cannabis Co., which put on the show.

“It’s not just someone selling bud out of a ziploc bag anymore. You’re seeing real brand development. The industry is growing up,” she said.

A variety of wares were available throughout the hall. Among the booths selling seeds and growing equipment were some potentially unexpected exhibitors, including a firm that provides financing for marijuana-related businesses.

“As we’ve moved closer to legalization, we’ve seen a more corporate side of the industry come about. You’re seeing more businesses get interested and say ‘How can I be part of this industry that’s going to be huge?”‘ Raey said.

There has been extreme growth in the marijuana business over the past few years, said Matt Christopherson, who works for Keirton, a company in Surrey, B.C., that makes automatic marijuana trimmers used in large-scale marijuana production facilities.

“It’s no longer mom and pop. There’s a lot of money coming into this industry that legitimizes everything,” he said.

As the industry grows, the stigma traditionally associated with marijuana begins to fall away, Christopherson added.

“There’s a lot of people who are capitalists and they see this as an emerging market, one of the fastest growing sectors in the world.”

Working within the industry has become easier in recent years because more data has become available, said Scott Wilkins, an independent insurance agent who has spent the last eight years providing policies for people who grow marijuana.

Wilkins said his work began when a man with a Health Canada license approached him looking to get insurance so he could rent a commercial building, which was incredibly difficult at the time.

Now Wilkins said he has more than 800 clients, including big companies licensed by the federal government. And he expects his business to continue growing as the federal government moves toward legalizing marijuana for recreational use.

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Cannabis industry to expand to $50 billion by 2026 | Bloomberg

CBD News Pick – Chicago Tribune | Bloomberg

The legal cannabis industry in the U.S. may grow to $50 billion in the next decade, expanding to more than eight times its current size, as lawful pot purveyors gain new customers and win over users from the illicit market, according to a new report.

Legalizing recreational use in California, where the drug is already medically permitted, is on the ballot in November, and approval of that measure alone would triple the size of the nation’s current $6 billion legal industry, according to a report from 10 Cowen & Co. analysts released on Monday. In all, voters in nine states will vote on weed-related initiatives this November — five to legalize the drug for all adults and four to allow for medical use.

Pot already is legal for recreational use in Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, Washington and the District of Columbia, and is medically permitted in 25 states. Cowen’s forecast assumes federal legalization of the drug, a measure that has more than 50 percent popular support.

“Cannabis prohibition has been in place for 80-plus years, but the tides are clearly turning,” the analysts said.

The expanding industry will affect big business even though the current competitive landscape is largely made up of smaller startups. Because the plant is still federally illegal, large companies have shied away from getting involved.

Legal weed would be a major opportunity for Big Tobacco, Cowen said. Vapor technology — a popular technique for ingesting both tobacco and cannabis — is an essential part of tobacco’s less combustible-dependent future. Companies like Altria Group Inc. and Reynolds American Inc. already have expertise in vapor and crop-growing technologies, as well as familiarity dealing with complex regulatory frameworks.

Tobacco companies may make up about one-fifth of the cannabis industry by 2036, adding more than 20 percent to their revenue, and nearly doubling tobacco’s underlying growth, the analysts said.

For alcoholic-beverage makers, legal marijuana is more foe than friend. Alcohol consumption has declined over the past five years, especially with men, while cannabis use has risen. The number of drinkers who also used marijuana increased, and the number of cannabis users who drank decreased, Cowen said.
Click here to continue reading the published article.


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For original content on the cannabis industry, plus news articles and insider views | handpicked by the CBD Business Blog Editor to keep you informed on cannabis and cannabidiol (CBD) industry news:

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